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Will I be sorry I threw out my old photos?

 

I spent the last two days going through three huge boxes of old photos from the pre-computer days with the original intent of scanning them to my computer.

Instead I threw the vast majority into the recycle bin.

Why?

  • The photos were not the greatest quality as I didn’t have a good camera in those days.
  • I’m not and never have been a good photographer. I blame this on poor eyesight and (more accurately) lack of real interest.
  • I had three questions as I looked through the pictures. Where is this? What is this? Who is this? If I couldn’t answer even one of those questions, I junked the photo.
  • Very often a fourth question came to mind. Why ever did I take this picture? And to the junk pile it went.

What did I keep?

  • Pictures of family, but only the ones of people I recognized and remembered. Why, oh why didn’t someone label those old photos, I asked myself as I leafed through them. And then, in the quandary of deciding what to do with each one, this question popped into mind. What, I thought, is the point of keeping a picture of some relative I don’t remember? How would I explain who he or she was to my granddaughter? And why would my granddaughter care about a stranger?

Will I regret the great “cull?”

  • I don’t think so.
  • I hope not.

Did I make a huge mistake?

What do you think?

What have you done with your old photos?

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

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Riding the water taxi home from downtown Victoria, BC, we see a … a … pirate ship? No cannon, no skull and cross bones on their flag, but a motley crew that can only be described as … pirates.

The Amara Zee drifted into our harbour today

A quick check on the Internet and we find that it’s a ship theatre! http://caravanstage.org/amarazee/

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse

Exploring Victoria, BC is always a treat for you never know what you’ll find around the next corner.

Fort Rodd Hill,


 

a coastal artillery fort, designed to defend Victoria and the Esquimalt Naval Base,  was built by the British in the 1890’s. Three gun batteries, underground magazines, command posts, guardhouses, barracks and searchlight emplacements remind us of a bygone era.

The lighthouse glimpsed in the first picture is the first lighthouse on Canada’s west coast. It’s still in operation although there hasn’t been a keeper here since the light was automated in 1929.

Built by the British in 1860, when Vancouver Island was not yet part of Canada, Fisgard’s red brick house and white tower has stood faithfully at the entrance to Esquimalt Harbour. Once a beacon for the British Royal Navy’s Pacific Squadron, today Fisgard still marks home base for the Royal Canadian Navy.

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

The wisdom of kids or Deciphering the family tree

Munchkin: Grandma, who’s that?
Me: That’s my mommy’s mom when she was a little girl.
Munchkin: Oh, so that’s mommy’s grandma.
Me: No, that’s your mommy’s great grandma and your great great grandma.
Munchkin: Oh, I get it! The older you are and the more time that passes, the greater you are.

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

What’s for lunch?

KOOKY Cones – ice cream at its best!

 

            With chunks of brownie

 

Cotton Candy

Kooky and regular cones, plus specialty items at Chocolats Favoris on Government Street, Victoira, BC

https://www.chocolatsfavoris.com/

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

Stories that won’t quit

Okay, here’s the thing. Ever since you were a kid you wanted to write a book.

You write that book and publish it.

BUT, the story just won’t quit and suddenly (or not so suddenly as you don’t write that fast) the one book morphs into four—never had you dreamed of writing a series, a sci-fi one at that.

Okay, that’s done. What next? A compilation of short, mostly humorous, bits.

And then?  Another story, of course. Never had you dreamed of writing a mystery, but here it is.

BUT, this too, does not want to quit and a few months later you have a sequel.

You don’t think these two will become a trilogy or a series, but you never know for you’ve learned that it’s the story that has the control, not the author.

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

 

 

Stories behind the door challenge

The challenge, should you choose to accept, is to write one of the stories holding its secrets behind this door (300 words maximum).

I’ll post your stories here and send you copies of my newest books — When the Sun was Mine and Whispers Under the Baobab (neither of which were found behind this door) — as a token of appreciation for your writing .

Please send your entries to darlene@darlenejonesauthor.com

http://www.darlenejonesauthor.com

The surprise of Dragon Alley

Dragon Alley connects Fisgard and Herald streets. Originally, there were two passageways through buildings that Michael Hart constructed on each street in 1890. The Hart’s Fisgard Building replaced a wooden hut once owned by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. The Hart’s Herald Building was constructed as a stable and carriage repair shop. In 1910, Quan Yuen Yen and Joe Gar Chow purchased both buildings, and in 1912 they built a three-section, two-storey lodging house between the two Hart buildings intersected by a north-south passageway that connected to the two walkways through the Hart buildings. This route through the three buildings is now known as Dragon Alley. In 2000-2001, Moore Paterson Architects of Victoria won architectural and heritage awards for their conversion of the derelict central Quan Yuen Yen building into updated live-work townhouses.

And this is what Dragon alley leads to now.