Posada – Christmas party Mexican style

Tonight (Dec. 19) we were honored to be invited to the neighbors’ Posada – a traditional Mexican party held at Christmas. We enjoyed Atole (a hot corn and chocolate drink) and ate tamales and of course had a piñata. See below for more information about Posadas.

 

How did posadas originate?
Posadas in Mexico began as a way for the Spaniards to teach native people about Christmas. During the nine days leading up to Christmas Day, masses would include representations of Mary and Joseph. Following mass was a party where people were blindfolded before hitting a piñata with a stick, a representation of faith defeating temptation with the help of virtue. The fruits and sweets that poured out of the piñata represented the joys of union with God.
In time, posadas started to be held in neighborhoods and people’s homes, becoming a more familiar and tightly-knit occasion, as well as preparation for Christmas. At the beginning of a posada, people are divided in two groups, the ones “outside” representing Mary and Joseph, and the ones “inside” representing innkeepers. Then everyone sings the posada litany together, re-enacting Mary and Joseph’s search, going back and forth until they are finally “admitted” to an inn. After this tradition, the party proper starts. Posadas have spread to other countries—such as Guatemala, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela; the celebrations vary by location. Carlos Villamayor

 

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Parking in Mexico

 

Found this fellow parked on the street in town the other day. When I approached he pulled back abruptly. His owner, a little old lady, told me that he only liked her, no one else. I’m guessing that these two have been together for years.

The owner changed from a baseball cap to the hat you see on the saddle, before mounting and riding away with her bags of groceries hanging from the saddle horn.

 

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Dia de la Revolucion — Mexico Independence Day

Mexico’s Revolution Day (Dia de la Revolucion) is a national public holiday that celebrates a 10-year revolution that began in 1910 to end the struggle against dictator José de la Cruz Porfirio Diaz Mori.

Our town celebrates with a grand parade comprised mostly of the children — school groups, dance groups, sports groups — with a few cowboys and their horses thrown in. After all this isn’t just a beach town. It’s also ranch country.

Here are some little revolutionaries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And their ammo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More revolutionaries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Storm watch and the useless Internet

The Mall in Mexico (Puerto Vallarta)

Stores? Of course. Our favorite is the Liverpool department store. Click here

Decorations? Of course:

 

And fun for the kids!

There is also a “jumping place” ie trampoline area that the munchkin particularly loves. For more about the mall click here

 

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