Emoji Expansion Speeds Up Demise of the English Languag

emojis

 

From: Brian Feinblum – http://bookmarketingbuzzblog.blogspot.ca/

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

We already know, thanks to the Internet, email, and social media that our language is becoming bastardized.  Technology has not aided the preservation of the English language, even if it’s greatly increased the amount of communication that transpires over the digital transom.  We now have sunk even lower with the expansion of emojis.

There’s even an official body to oversee the modern-day hieroglyphics, The Unicode Consortium.  They will unveil the 72 new symbols in June.  Six dozen more images will come to express emotions, gestures, sports, foods, animals and other things that we used to apply the task of having real words label or describe.

Will we turn into the Chinese, using hundreds of characters to convey a thought, its meaning dependent on just slight inflections of the voice or a juxtaposition on paper?

I don’t like where this is going.  I get the happy face, sad face imagery.  It’s pretty clear cut what they mean.  The rest is all bullshit.  Why must we continue to make up words that formulate Netspeak?  Why must we remove grammar and proper spelling just because the communication is texted?  Why do we shorten words, reducing some to one letter?  R U following me?  Thnx.

The emojis, if we keep expanding the roster into the hundreds or thousands, could threaten our digital communications to the point we will defeat the purpose of correspondence, which is to actually understand each other.

Emojis make us lazy and continued mass-scale use will leave people with weakened writing skills. Our vocabularies will suffer.  As we fail to communicate in detail, tone and depth – with emojis and not words – we make our world seem smaller, if not simpler.  Emojis lack texture, context, and description. Sure a picture is worth a thousand words, but emojis can’t accurately reflect nor inspire deep thoughts, raw feelings, nor reflect well-developed ideas.

Emojis are nothing more than the graffiti of today’s tech-savvy but relationship-deficient generation.  Do I heart emojiis?  Do they make me smile or frown? They leave me feeling crappy.  Oh, wait there’s an emoji for that.  Here you go – see, I wasted words trying to tell you how I feel when I could’ve just clicked on this singular image.  Maybe I’m the deficient one.  Sorry, no emoji to represent that concept or state of being.  Not yet, anyway.

We’re in the ugly era of OMG, LMAO, and TMI.  If you don’t know what those mean, you are screwed.  But the truth is, we’re all going to pay a heavy price if we keep replacing the English language with abbreviations, images and net slang.

It was announced recently that someone had transcribed the Bible into a version that is filled only with emojis.  Yes, a whole book, one that is challenging enough to live by, let alone understand and interpret, is now in full emoji form. Will this be repeated for other classics?  Instead of “reading Shakespeare” we will piece his works together as if we’re playing Pictionary.

Maybe we’ll save money on the education system and just have all of the classes removed that teach language, vocabulary or reading. We can replace them with a robot-led tutorial on the use of emojis.

 

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4 comments on “Emoji Expansion Speeds Up Demise of the English Languag

  1. Back in 1993 I re-read the Bible in its entirety for the fourth time except that I was looking for all the negative things because I was pretty sure they outweighed any positive things. Then I discovered the digital Bible and bought it so I could delete all the negative things or neutral things (like who begat whom) to see how much positive was left. I formatted the digital Bible so that it was 8½x11″ pages, 1″ margins, 12-point Prestige Elite font, single line spacing with ½” first line indent. Something like 350+ pages. When I finished reading The Bible for the fifth time and deleting all the negative stuff, I was down to 33 pages. That convinced me.

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